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greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
to talk about greece or not, whether i want to dive straight into the banking union and what chance have we possibly got of getting agreement. >> let's talk about greece, much more fun. no, greece we have to get out of the way. is the debt by back program going to be successful, everyone nds it will. we know that's the one little lynchpin on which everything else rests. so if it's not, the money will not flow, but everybody insists as when he headed into the euro group meeting yesterday that it will be successful. that's also what what we hear from the greeks. there's a bit of arm fwising, but it will probably go through. and then lo and behold ahead of the actual summit in the morning, they can sign up the check for the next greek installment also we hope. we're also closer to a little rescue package for cypress. spanish aid package for the banks is on track. so that was the working list last night. another thing on the to-do list. the head of the euro group confirmed last night that, no, i will not extend anything now, i will definitely leave as head of the euro group at the end of thi
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no eal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the econom
that didn't have. greece does not have an exit. citigroup had a 90% chance earlier this year. the biggest day of this jurn year was june 17th when they elected a moderate who did not try to pull greece out. and germany stepped up and gave them some money and that september the 6th, that was the european central bank. so you had china, maria, the united states and greece. none of them went off the cliff. maria, this is for you. our little christmas present for you, maria. >> thank you. thank you. >> we want to remember, by the way, this is emblem attic of all these nice things you have said this week for the victims of the newtown connecticut tragedy. we love the way you all have been strong in support of them. >> thank you. i very much appreciate that. michael, let me ask you, what do you want to be avoiding in 2013? >> i think you have to look at it from the standpoint of extreme. it's clearly in the bond market. it's clearly in the love for dividends. it's clearly in the love for income versus capital appreciation, versus cycle kral. i call this the rocky balboa stock market. we've had
the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an orderly fashion. timothy masssad will join us later. this could be a buy signal with the government signaling i
. but michael was out in greece. he might tell us what happens when you allow tax increases to chase after spending and you don't have any restraint in all, however works out. gerri: california's just approved a $6 billion tax hike. what can you tell us about our future? >> it is retroactive. active january 1st of 2 dozen 12. it does not start ne yar. it already started. increasing our sales ta. the people run in this whole operation moved to texas. if you want to visit califnia anymore go to dallas, houston, fort worth because that is where people are going. people learn to livesmall, and this is what people understand. my taxes go u maybe al nly give up petty an many every other week. maybe i will get my hair cut every twwes but every three. this is what goes on. and if youraise my taxes i'm going to c cut back somewhere. who gets hurt is the little guy on the totem pole. gerri: rahway ago. thank you for coming on tonight. thank you. all right. yet another big corporations rushing to avoid a huge tax bill on t fiscal cliff. oracle said it uld pay tree of next year's dividends this year.
they agreed to give greece now within days 34 billion euros. they've done a deal where the ecb will regulate the biggest banks in europe and, importantly, the germans will be exempted, state run banks, savings banks. so the skeletons can stay in the german closet there as far as the banks are concerned. that was important for the germans. it is ironic in a year when so many people called for a breakup the european union this summit, poland actually said we'd like to start off applications to become the 18th member of the eurozone. that will play out during the course of next year. as far as the stock markets are concerned, today is relatively flat overall. no follow through from china which i mentioned earlier. i thought it was very interesting. here you go. >> the european markets are closing now. >> some are red. some are green. if you check the data you'll see we haven't really moved at all today. china was up 4%. shanghai was up 4% overnight. normally you would expect the australian miners, global miners listed in london to bounce on that. they didn't very much today. and that is partly
the lines of what spain did or ireland or greece, cut back our social programs dramatically. we'll have to do what the rest of europe will do over time, which is accept a lower standard of living forever everybody which is why the longer-term plan is so vital, not the short-term craziness. because everybody knows he we can't keep providing americans with the current level of services unless we raise taxes in a big way on erin and cut spending somehow. even the democrats are unwilling to consider that kind of tax cut. that's why long-term spending cuts are so important. they figure into the job creation of the next 25 to 30 years, and the ability of people to stay out of poverty longer term. in the meantime, you can't get the growth needed for government receipts to go higher even in the near term. put simply, if you got someone from honeywell or eaton or celgene in the rule, explain the impact. the imperative would be to get this fiscal cliff done before vacation. hey, listen, yes, no vacation without legislation. because the longer the delay the fewer reasons to start a business and th
that italy and greece would be following in disaster. of course, they subsequently turned out to be the single best places to invest for fixed income in the world. not only did the sky not fall, but you had to do some serious buying to keep up with the others around the world. we have been buying an etf for my travel trust. was there a more uniform agreement than the idea that the euro had to die and the weaker countries were going into a fre depression? we know a ton of countries that could do very well in a low-growth environment. a year ago all the wise guys were telling us to avoid china because it was a house of cards. the course only grew more uniform with the chinese market falling to multiyear lows. but in the last few weeks, china's economy bottomed during the summer as they were focused way too much on beating inflation. now it's become the best performer in the world, and i don't think you've missed the move which is why my trust has been buying an etf that mimics china. finally there's apple. we've become addicted to apple. we are deeply focused on its decline whic
was supposed to vanish by this time with the secret sellers around the country. i thought greece was supposed to be kicked out of the union. instead, my advice, do what my charitable trust did today, buy european stocks. you know where else there's much more to come? yep, oh boy was this one a hated one coming into this year. yeah, you know what i'm talking about, china. how about that economy over there? after pausing because the government was busy whipping inflation, now, thank you, late gerald ford, now it's coming on strong. i think growth in china's accelera accelerating. the stock market might be the most undervalued in the world. the stock market entirely could be under valued. how many short sellers told you to do the opposite and sell that market? after the steam roller it's been of late, what exactly are the short sellers saying now? i don't know, i'm not hearing them clearly. i'm not listening. i'm not, no, i'm not hearing. europe and china both were supposed to slip into oblivion in 2012. that was the easiest story, everybody wrote it. turned out two fabulous places to invest. ho
it in france. they just did it in spain. they just did it in the u.k. >> they did it in greece. they raised the added-value tax four times. it's devastating consumer spending, and we're heading down the same road. david: larry mcdonald, new edge senior director. good to see you. thanks for coming in, appreciate it. sandy? >> ford recalling nearly 90,000 vehicles. did your car make the list? we've got the details coming up. >>> plus, the chances of falling off the fiscal cliff, it's not stopping one top money manager from buying. bob doll, he sells us where he's putting his money to work now. that's next. there is no mass-produced human. every humabeing is unique. and ther one store that recognizes it. the sleep number store. the only place in the world u'll find the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. an exclusive collection of innovations that totally individualize your sleep. perfectly comfortable pillows that adjust to your size and shape. dual warmth comforters. all designed around the sleep number bed: a bed with dual-air technology that allows you adjust to the suppo
at the currency and isolation. >> steven, stay there. selling 1.3 billion euros in three-month t-bills for greece. the bid to cover ratio, 1.73%. this allocation did include a 30% noncompetitive tranche. in other central bank news, it's been quite a busy day on that front. the central bank says use the repo rate holing at this level in the coming year warning the recovery is taking its toll on the economy. >>> and in australia, the rba eps's decision to lower rates appears to find a close one. central banks included keeping the rates on hold. still, policymakers were more concerned by more than expected slowdown in mining and investment. and japan's prime minister elect has told the country's central bank to consider adopt ago 2% inflation target. shinzo abe made the claim today. the bank is expected to cut borrowing costs at its rate setting meeting this week. steven, in light of all of this news, kind of goes back to the point that we were just making, that are a lot of central banks trying to use interest rates effectively as a way to depress the value of their currency even though we're seein
of greece. we saw these up in the range of better than 8% earlier. now in the range of 5% to 8%. again, if you look at the levels, you see we're snapping up from low valuations generally speaking. it doesn't take a lot at 63 cents to get an 8% move. >>> quick look over here if you want to take a shot of the wall behind me. it is green for the most part. and greece's borse is one adding 2% today. we're seeing that reflected across the bond space. portugal for example seeing ten-year yields falling. same for spain and italy. the boreses and footy 100, the xetra dax, this has been the outperformer up in the range of 30%. another .3% after the ifo out of germany. came in better than expected. again, a good sign for growth. not necessarily, though, for those who would like to see a weaker europe. the ibex 35 adding 1.3%. and the nikkei, as you mentioned, up above 10,000 for the first time in eight months. adding 2.4%. better hope the moves in the japanese government or bank of japan pan out. we'll get the bank of japan's decision tomorrow. but this comes on the day when, remember, it's on t
we get to 2020, we're going to be in the shape greece is in with 152% of our gdp being locked into debt. we cannot sustain this. you have to begin to make some systematic across the board and detailed reductions in this spending discretionary and on the entitlement and you have to deal with the trust funds and treat them as trust funds, not as pass-throughs to the general fund. >> congresswoman, thank you very much. i know it's a busy day. >> it is. thank you. >> congresswoman blackburn. >>> steve liesman is working on this since late last night. at the very least, steve, it's high theater, wouldn't you agree? >> high theater and complex math, carl. what we want to do is concentrate on what i market really cares about. how far apart are the sides? unfortunately, it is so complicated we can only do one piece at a time. so we're only in this presentation going to talk about revenue, not spending. and i have to say, these are the best available numbers? are they the actual numbers? we have only run them by each side and they have said that they are not far off or as close as you
harry, during one of the breaks, talking about greece. you had an unconventional view, i think, of what's going on there. >> still tons of issues, major risks but i think finally some signs after five years of decline, it is starting to bottom. first, the eu demonstrated they will do anything to keep power, partly because he has made some progress and partly because the alternatives are scarry. finally seeing improvements in the budget deficit numbers. >> you are buying stuff? >> looking at stuff. finally start to see investors move in 2013. already seen government bonds in 2012 and i think you will see asset sales. >> you agree? you remember your name before -- >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now, time for "squawk on the street." >>> good morning, welcome to squawk on the street. i'm carl quintanilla, melissaly, jim cramer. nyse euro net selling itself to ice for 8.2 billion in cash and stock. david is here to break it down. >> go through some of the numbers four. the deal itself having been officially announced in the last half hour or so b
this yesterday that greece has priced the debt buyback where it has. it will be more generous and next week they're likely to get their money from the rest of the european union. taking some of those concerns back out of the market so, again, today the spanish bond market rallying and, therefore, the yield forming. still above 5% but falling. it's also true of italy. there the yields are down. take a look at where we are on the ten year, 4.4% and those bonds rise in value, you see the italian banks, for example, rising in value. the stock market, it's obvious the value of their assets is gaining ground. other financials around europe, the likes of kbc, bank of ireland, a lot of questions to the degree the irish can get better terms for their bailout or deal as a result of what the greeks have been given. there is -- and carl mentioned this, one area of concern today, and that's the finance minister's meeting where the frie french and the germans seem at odds over how they're going to get banking union, the germans are saying it cannot -- the individual banks cannot all be controlled by the ecb,
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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